Let freedom ring: Indie publishing is becoming a more and more attractive alternative

This is a guest post by Terri Giuliano Long

A couple weeks back, we ran an article called “Indie stigma and the true indie spirit.” Consider this part two.

For better or worse, the days when they were the sole gatekeepers are behind us. Today, rejection by traditional houses says little about a book. “Some wonderful books [are rejected] for various reasons—nothing to do with quality,” says Jenny Bent. A publisher may reject a book because it doesn’t fit into a clear category. A traditional house may also turn down a book if it doesn’t have an obvious audience or if the author has too small a platform or a poor sales track with previous books.

In the old days, determined authors turned to self-publishing—or vanity presses, as they were called—as a last resort. Serious authors, concerned about being black- balled, dared not self-publish. As a result, talented authors like John Kennedy Toole, whose posthumously published masterpiece, A Confederacy of Dunces, won a Pulitzer Prize (1981), went to their grave believing their work did not measure up.

Today, many talented authors choose the self-publishing route and they do it for a variety of reasons. Jackie Collins recently shocked the literary world with her announcement that she planned to self-publish a new, rewritten version of her novel The Bitch. “Times are changing,” Collins said of her decision, “and technology is changing, so I wanted to experiment with this growing trend of self-publishing.”

Industry superstars like New York Times bestselling authors Barbara Freethy and C.J. Lyons use self-publishing platforms to market their out-of-print backlists. Other authors are drawn to self-publishing because of its flexibility, the ability to publish within their own timeframe, for instance—perhaps to leverage topical interest or mark an anniversary. Others authors self-publish out of a desire for artistic control.

Self-publishing can also be a practical way to build an audience. Today, publishers expect authors to have a solid platform. By self-publishing, emerging authors can build the fan base necessary to attract a traditional publisher for their next work. Other authors, long-timers as well as newbies, feel they can make more money on their own. At $2.99 a pop, authors earn nearly $2.00 on every eBook sale. Even at 99¢, with average royalties of 33¢ to 60¢, earnings on a hot-selling book can quickly out-pace the meager advance offered to all but the superstars by a traditional house.

These days—insult-hurling aside—traditional and indie authors are more alike than different. Mindful of their increased scrutiny, self-publishers take full advantage of the myriad professional services available to authors. Indies hire experienced editors to copyedit and proofread. For their cover and interior designs, some work with the same graphic artists who design for the traditional houses. Professionals are available and widely used to covert documents to digital and paperback formats, and POD printing has gotten so good that, to the typical untrained eye, print-on-demand books are virtually indistinguishable from books printed on an offset press.

Literary agent and publishing consultant Joelle Delbourgo, founder and president of Joelle Delbourgo Associates, Inc., formerly a senior publishing executive at Random House and HarperCollins, says some self-publishers go a step further and work with a professional publishing partner, a strategy she recommends. A publishing pro with a track record of success can bring an author to the next level, Delbourgo says.

For a few years, Bethanne Patrick, a publicist and media consultant also known as “The Book Maven,” creator of the global reading community Friday Reads, was skeptical of self-publishing. Through her work in social media, Patrick has read more indie titles and gotten to know writers who’ve chosen to self-publish. More and more indie authors, she’s noticed, seek the advice of freelance editors, publicists, and marketing consultants—and she’s intrigued.

As well-educated and experienced writers—emerging authors who’ve honed their craft as well as established and traditionally published authors—increasingly opt to go the indie route, the bar is rising.  As with indie musicians and filmmakers, indie authors bring new life to an evolving industry. Today, readers have access to a wealth of funny, poignant, brilliant voices of talented new authors from around the globe—voices that, just a few years ago, might have been silenced by the old guard.

The opportunity to self-publish—to publish their books their own way—has given both emerging and established authors more freedom than ever before. So, yes, now that readers choose which books to purchase and support, dollars may shift and some traditional authors may be forced to give up a slice of the pie. Change is never easy; inevitably, there are bumps and bruises along the way. But, like it or not, indie publishing is here to stay. And the publishing world will be all the richer for it.

Look for an extended version of this post on Huffington Post and IndieReader.com later today!

Terri Giuliano LongAbout this post’s author:

Terri Giuliano Long is a contributing writer for IndieReader and Her Circle eZine. She has written for numerous publications, including the Boston Globe and the Huffington Post. She lives with her family on the East Coast and teaches at Boston College. In Leah’s Wake, her debut novel, began as her master’s thesis. For more information, please visit her website or connect via Facebook, Twitter or her Blog.


18 Comments

  1. Thank you for the inspiration article, Ms. Long. I’ve gotten on the self-pub / epub bandwagon and I love it. It lets me focus more on the fun stuff (marketing, writing, talking about books and stories) and completely obliterates the boring stuff (writing query letters to please agents in the hope that one complete stranger’s opinion falls in your favor that perhaps they can get a publisher’s smile to turn your way.)

    Epub is much faster, too. Looking forward to publishing more and more!

    Larry Nocella
    author the novels Where Did This Come From? and Loser’s Memorial available on Amazon

  2. Amazing article you stated all of the reasons why i’m choosing to self-publish and encourage others to do the same. Thank you for such a positive article!
    Janiera recently posted..Promotion Spotlight:Ruthless by Cheryl DouglasMy Profile

  3. The new world of publishing is an oyster waiting to be scarfed down by informed writers. Why wouldn’t we take advantage of every opportunity that helps us live our dreams? The better we educate ourselves on the tools available to us, the more we give the readers that chance to vote with their dollars. Thanks for an excellent article (both articles), Terri.
    SuzanneG recently posted..Telling Tales: Surrounded by Hans’ and Grimm’s CharactersMy Profile

  4. Thank you so much Larry! I completely agree – it gives you so much more control. There are so many many plus points.

    Good luck with your ongoing publishing journey!

  5. Thank you so much for your wonderful comment Janiera! Good luck going forward!

  6. I absolutely agree Suzanne! Self-publishing is an opportunity to be embraced. It won’t be for everyone, but that certainly doesn’t mean it isn’t for anyone!

    Thank you so much for your comment!

  7. Actually, CJ isn’t doing backlist– Tor dropped her contract on her, so she went indie.

    I’ve been an author since 1991 when my first book came out and I can honestly say there’s never been a better time to be a writer. We have more opportunities than ever before. Of course, that also means we have more responsibility.

    However, it is as difficult to succeed at self-publishing as it was with traditional. The difference is, more control is in the author’s hands now.
    Bob Mayer recently posted..SOP for Authors Using Audible ACX by Bob MayerMy Profile

  8. Thank you so much for your comment, Bob, and for the clarification about CJ. Your point about success is an important one – self-publishing may be condemned because it is so accessible, but achieving success still takes an incredible amount of work, plus – of course – a quality product!

  9. There you go, Terri. I have one thing now that I wouldn’t if I hadn’t self published; and that is a book. A book my readers enjoy and that makes their lives better. The real approval we seek if not from a publisher or an editor, but from the hordes of adoring fans that are out there. We just know they are :)
    Brian Holers recently posted..How men communicateMy Profile

  10. I think the internet has revolutionized the writing industry (I hope I can call it so..).

    Now one doesn’t need to search for good publishers to publish teir work. with e-books, kindles available, you can write and publish your book on net and there are places like Amazon where you can sell them.. It is indeed a great thing for budding writers!
    Mat Slair recently posted..Discount sites could cost you moneyMy Profile

  11. That’s so true Brian! Self-publishing is often condemned due to the lack of gatekeepers – but the gatekeepers are out there in the form of savvy readers! They know what they want and love, and they’re willing to share their opinions. Even if you’re able to land a traditional publishing contract, winning over readers is still the vital step!

  12. Absolutely Mat! The opportunities are rife. A quality product and a commitment to readers is vital, but if you’re willing to work, the possibilities are increasing!

  13. This was a great post. Says everything I’ve been thinking about self-publishing for a while now. Thanks!

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  15. Very cool web site! Excellent. I’ll bookmark your site and take the feeds additionally.
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  16. This is one of those kinds of articles that needs more numbers. All evidence I’ve seen from speaking directly with people suggests less money through self-publishing (although clearly more freedom) not more – unless you’re already a well established author.

  17. Great post! I just love how we have so many choices these days.
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